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New DRC Branding

As part of our continuing 20 in 2020 celebrations, DRC recently unveiled its new logo at the Canadian Horticultural Council (CHC) AGM in Ottawa, Canada. Also, in our latest press release and President’s Message, we told you about our recent rebranding efforts. We are updating our website, letterhead and membership certificate to incorporate the new DRC look and feel. The refreshed website will enhance your user experience, making it easier for you to find the information you need. For a preview of our new logo, letterhead and membership certificate, click on the following links: logo, letterhead and membership certificate.

We especially wanted to show you a sample membership certificate, since we know Canadian members sometimes use it as proof of membership to satisfy Canadian authorities when importing goods. We have also shared our new look and feel with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) to help you avoid any challenges due to our rebranding.

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Choice of Law: International Contracts

For our members in the United States, particularly those under PACA, the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) is a familiar reference when contract law issues occur. It is also common for contracts to refer to state law or jurisdictional law, since these may differ from federal law. Each country has its own legislation governing contract formation and performance. Canada, for example, has a Provincial Sales of Goods Act in each province, except for Québec, which is governed by its Civil Code.

The choice of law becomes even more critical when dealing outside your own country. Some jurisdictions have provisions that may favor citizens of their country. As global trade expands, it is inevitable that more disputes will arise. Therefore, it is essential to understand the implications of the relevant laws in the global marketplace.

For trade between most countries, the default law is The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), also known as the Vienna Convention. Most trading nations, including the US and Canada, are signatories to this convention, meaning that they have agreed to its application when trading with another member state.

Are there real differences between UCC and CISG?

To answer that question, we asked an expert to do a bit of research comparing the UCC to the CISG.

Professor Anthony Daimsis is a Law Professor and member of the International Law Group at the University of Ottawa. He is Director of the Faculty of Law’s Moot Court program, and of the National Program. He also teaches courses in international arbitration and international sales law at Osgoode Hall, and lectures on international arbitration for the Swiss International Law School. Prof. Daimsis is author of the forthcoming book, International Arbitration: the fundamentals and the indispensables, as well as The Common Law Lawyer’s Guide to the Convention on the International Sale of Goods.

Comparing the CISG’s Contract Formation Provisions with those of UCC

The following page provides a non-exhaustive list of differences between the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”) and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (“CISG”) focussing particularly on contract formation provisions. Below are four important differences between the UCC and the CISG.

Executive Summary

First, parties may form CISG contracts orally; no written evidence is necessary.  In contrast, the UCC requires parties to put into writing contracts worth over $500.   The same is true for modifications; parties seeking to modify UCC contracts worth over $500 must use a written modification, while parties may modify CISG contracts orally provided the contract does not preclude oral modification.

Second, unlike under the UCC, no parol evidence rule exists under the CISG. This means that under the CISG, decision makers can examine all surrounding circumstances when interpreting a contract, including negotiations and subsequent conduct.  In contrast, the UCC limits decision makers to the “four corners” of the written contract and negotiations are only useful to complement the written agreement.

The third difference lies in the consequences of parties failing to fix a price at contract formation. Absent a price – the UCC fixes the price and ties it to what is reasonable at the time of delivery.  In contrast, when a CISG contract does not name a price, the CISG fixes it at what is reasonable at the time the contract is concluded.

Lastly, while parties may make irrevocable offers (firm offers) under both the UCC and the CISG, under the UCC these offers will not remain irrevocable beyond three months.  The CISG, however, places no such time limit.  In addition, under the UCC, if the firm offer language appears on a form supplied by the offeree, the offeror needs to separately sign, initial, or otherwise authenticate the part of the contract that makes the offer irrevocable. The CISG has no such requirement.

  1. ORAL AND MODIFIED AGREEMENTS

Parties may form CISG contracts orally; no written evidence is necessary.  In contrast, the UCC requires parties to put into writing contracts worth over $500.   The same is true for modifications; parties seeking to modify UCC contracts worth over $500 must use a written modification, while parties may modify CISG contracts orally provided the contract does not preclude oral modification.

APPLICATION

Example I-A (oral agreements)

Party A telephones Party B requesting 10,000lbs of potatoes, packed in 1000 x 10lb bags, at $3 per bag, delivery in one week. No money is exchanged and the potatoes are never delivered.

  • Under the UCC, this contract is not enforceable.
  • Under the CISG, this contract is enforceable.

Four exceptions exist under the UCC’s Statute of Frauds

The Ten-Day-Reply Doctrine

(See UCC, §2-201(2))

Specially Manufactured Goods

(See UCC, §2-201(3)(a))

The Admission Exception

(See UCC §2-201(3)(b))

The “Payment or Delivery and Acceptance” Exception

(See UCC §2-201(3)(c))

Example I-B (modification)

Party A sends a written offer to Party B requesting 10,000lbs of potatoes, packed in 1000 x 10lb bags, at $3 per bag, delivery in one week. Two days later, Party A calls Party B asking it to instead send 500 x 20lb bags, at $6 per bag. One week later, Party B sends 1000 x 10lb bags of potatoes.

  • Under the UCC, a court relying on the four corners rule may not enforce the amendment.
  • Under the CISG, this contract is enforceable if Party A can prove the modification was requested (offered) and accepted…

For a complete version of Prof. Daimsis article, please click here.

We recognize that this will likely generate some discussion and look forward to answering your questions in future Solutions blogs.

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DRC Trading Standards – Section 21-Interpretation and Glossary of Terms

We have reached the end of our series on DRC Trading Standards. This last post in the series will address Section 21 and the Glossary of Terms.

Section 21 states that if DRC members fail to act in accordance with DRC standards, to calculate damages, the United States Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) will be used to fill those gaps that DRC Trading Standard do not address. It also mentions that an alternative to the UCC could be the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods (CISG).

Additionally, Section 21 determines which currency will prevail if the contract between parties is not specific. Finally, it reiterates that for all DRC members, these Trading Standards apply whether dealing with a member or non-member, unless agreed otherwise.

Glossary of Terms

If a DRC member requires clarification regarding the rights and responsibilities of each player in our industry, such as brokers or agents, the definitions are found in this section. The Glossary also provides fast access to some of the terms frequently used in our industry, such as “commercial value,” “guaranteed minimum price,” or “suitable shipping condition.”

We hope our analysis of DRC Trading Standards has helped clarify the terms, concepts and definitions that our industry commonly uses. Feel free to contact our Help Desk if you would like to discuss our standards.

Here’s a complete list of links to previous articles connected to DRC Trading Standards:

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Membership Updates –February 2020

Welcome New Members

In February, DRC welcomed the following new members:

  • AGRICOLA LA VENTA S.A. (Lima, Peru)
  • AGROFINE IMPORT, EXPORT AND COMECIALIZATION INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • ALWAYS GREEN CORPORATION (California, USA)
  • ANGAR TRADING COMPANY INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • AVO INTEGRA SAPI DE CV (Ario de Rosales, Mexico)
  • CALCULUS CONSULTING AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • COMERCIALIZADORA DE FRUTAS DE TACAMBARO, S.A. DE C.V. (Tacambaro, Mexico)
  • CPS FRUITS & VEGETABLES INC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • FRESH PLUS PRODUCE LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • FRESH PREP FOODS INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • FRUTERA EUROAMERICA II SPA (Santiago, Chile)
  • GENIO ENTERPRISES (A d/b/a of Li He) (British Columbia, Canada)
  • GREWAL & SONS ENTERPRISES INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • K & C SPECIALTIES INC. (California, USA)
  • LT FARM, INC. (California, USA)
  • SAN DIEGO FARMS LLC (Also d/b/a Fresh Origins)
  • SERVICIOS COMERCIALES AGROFINE EXPORT SPA (California, USA)
  • STANLEY MARKET LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • WR INTERNATIONAL INC. (California, USA)

DRC Membership: change in status

Automatic Terminations

On February 28, 2020, R & G DRAPER FARMS KESWICK LTD.  was expelled from DRC for for failing to comply with an arbitration award in the amount of $86,719.88 USD, which is a violation of the DRC By-Laws and the Dispute Resolution Rules. Responsibly connected parties: Ross Draper (President) and Gerald Frederick Draper (Secretary).

As of February 29, the following organizations no longer hold a DRC membership:

  • 1st R.O.W. ESTATE WINERY LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • AGHA IMPEX INC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • AUVIL FRUIT COMPANY, INC. (Washington, USA)
  • BARAN IMPORT EXPORT (A d/b/a of Tekin Baran) (Ontario, Canada)
  • CORNERSTONE CONSULTING AND AFRICAN PRODUCTS INC. (Alberta, Canada)
  • DES MOINES TRUCK BROKERS, INC. (Also, d/b/a DMTB) (Iowa, USA)
  • DIRECT PRODUCE MARKETING LTD. (Alberta, Canada)
  • FRESH ORIGINS, LLC (California, USA)
  • LATINOTRADING LLC (Florida, USA)
  • LESTER CRAIG INC. (Prince Edward Island, Canada)
  • LOYAL ENTERPRISES LTD (Saskatchewan, Canada)
  • MARS FREIGHT LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • MEET THE GREEN PRODUCE, LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • MEREX INCORPORATED (Nova Scotia, Canada)
  • R & R GLOBAL HOLDINGS LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • R & R PRODUCE INC. (Alberta, Canada)
  • SALISH SHORE IMPORT INCORPORATED (British Columbia, Canada)
  • TURK ENTERPRISES LTD. (Manitoba, Canada)
  • WILSON PRODUCE LLC (Arizona, Canada)

For details regarding a change in status, please contact the office.

Important note: Following membership termination, the former member remains liable for claims arising prior to their termination if the claim is submitted to DRC by way of a Notice of Dispute within nine (9) months from when the claim arose or within nine (9) months from when the claimant ought reasonably to have known of its existence.

About DRC

DRC is a non-profit membership-based organization whose core work is business-to-business commercial dispute resolution for produce. DRC is a referee between parties when a purchase and sale do not go according to plan. Members adhere to a common set of trading standards and member responsibilities that promote fair and ethical trading for produce entering the North American marketplace. In Canada, membership in the DRC is a regulatory requirement to trade fresh fruits and vegetables (i.e.: buy, sell, import, export) unless excepted from the regulations. Today, DRC has members in 14 countries outside of North America, and membership continues to grow annually. Anyone exporting fresh fruits and vegetables to Canada must sell to a DRC member.

In addition to the DRC’s Operating Rules and Trading Standards, DRC offers a comprehensive, tailored suite of tools to build the knowledge and capacity of members to avoid or resolve disputes, including education, mediation and arbitration. DRC can impose sanctions and disciplinary actions towards members who do not conduct business in accordance with the terms of their membership agreement.

To date, DRC has resolved claims in excess of $83 million dollars. Although arbitration is available, 80% of these claims have been settled in an average of 26 days through our informal consultation/mediation services. Arbitration awards are court enforceable in countries that are signatories to the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards or subsequent conventions.

 

To learn more, reach out to our Help Desk at info@fvdrc.com or (+1) 613-234-0982 or visit us at www.fvdrc.com.

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Have you paid your membership fees?

A friendly reminder that annual membership fees are due. Per the By-laws of the Corporation, failure to pay membership fee may result in termination of your membership, and leave you unprotected in future sales. If you have any questions regarding your outstanding annual membership fees, please contact us asap at DRC Help Desk | +1-613-234-0982 | info@fvdrc.com

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DRC Trading Standards – Section 20 – Trade Terms

As part of our continuing series to review Trading Standards, Section 20 contains those terms that are commonly used in North America.  A few articles in our Solutions Newsletter and Blog have been written focusing on situations where these trade terms are used. We will address most of these terms, which have to do with sometimes inconsistent INCOTERMS (see article North American Terms vs INCOTERMS).

For example, in North America, the most used terms are FOB and Delivered. However, in DRC’s trade terms which are very similar to PACA’s trade terms, the term FOB includes additional terms such as “FOB Acceptance”, “FOB Acceptance Final”, “FOB Inspection and Acceptance Arrival”, “FOB sale at a delivered price” and “FOB Steamer.” These terms are somewhat unusual and because they severely restrict rights and responsibilities they need to be discussed, understood and agreed upon to apply to a transaction. These terms are fully defined in this section of the Trading Standards and you should become familiar with them.

Another term included in this section is “Price After Sale (P.A.S.)” or “Open Price.” There is still some confusion between buyers and sellers using P.A.S. or Open Price which is not the same as consignment (P.A.S.  & Consignment Article). We have seen cases where these terms are interchanged and results in a different outcome from what was understood or expected.

Finally, “Purchase After Inspection,” “Shipping Point Inspection” and “Shipping Point Inspection Final” are also severely restrictive terms. These terms impact the rights of a buyer and the responsibilities of the seller and are very different from more commonly used terms. These terms require an inspection to be made either at shipping point or another location and limit the right of a buyer/receiver to make a claim after an inspection has been performed. In other words, the risk is passed to the buyer after an inspection is performed and limits the right to reject and or make claims at destination.

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Membership Updates – January 2020

Welcome New Members

In January, DRC welcomed the following new members:

  • Carthagro INC. (Québec, Canada)
  • Similien Produits Frais INC. (Québec, Canada)
  • Recyglobe Canada (Québec, Canada)
  • Panchvati Supermarket (Ontario, Canada)
  • Cogent Transport (Alberta, Canada)
  • 2727221 Ontario INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Hong King Food Market LTD. (Alberta, Canada)
  • Easybuy Trading LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Fiston Ikwa Ndol Mbutiwi (Québec, Canada)
  • A-Mart Trading CORP. (Alberta, Canada)
  • Bacata Food Group INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • 2596604 Ontario INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Bles Farms (Alberta, Canada)
  • Arsaces General Trading INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Peri & Sons Farm, INC. (Nevada, USA)
  • Shipley Sales, LLC. (Arizona, USA)
  • Top Shelf Speciality (California, USA)
  • Les Produits et Saveurs Méditerranéennes (Québec, Canada)

DRC Membership: change in status

As of January 31, the following organizations no longer hold a DRC membership:

  • Abbotsford Growers LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • All Season Farms LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Blue Glacier Seafood Group INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Centreport Canada INC. (Manitoba, Canada)
  • Chong Lee Market (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Colonial Garden Centre LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Entreprise Promocurl INC. (Québec, Canada)
  • Exportadora Sergio Ruiz Tagle Humeres Limitada (Metropolitana, Chile)
  • Exportadora Y Servicios Rucaray S.A. (Providencia, Chile)
  • Green Island Produce, INC. (California, USA)
  • Groupe Frutex INC. (Québec, Canada)
  • Jardin Vert / Green Garden (Québec, Canada)
  • Matmata Prince Commerce INC. (Québec, Canada)
  • N&S Traders INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Nizam Produce INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Rokan Distribution LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Sambafruits / Belavistabrasil (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
  • Savco U.S.A. CORP. (New Jersey, USA)
  • Seafood Express (P.E.I.) Limited (Prince Edward Island, Canada)
  • Sham Import Export (Québec, Canada)
  • Sociedad De Produccion Rural De Ri Villacarriedo Spr De Ri (Chiapas, Mexico)
  • Sybaris Market, S.L. (Valencia, Spain)
  • Tropical Superfruits Trading INC. (Ontario, Canada)

For details regarding a change in status, please contact the office.

Important note: Following membership termination, the former member remains liable for claims arising prior to their termination if the claim is submitted to DRC by way of a Notice of Dispute within nine (9) months from when the claim arose or within nine (9) months from when the claimant ought reasonably to have known of its existence.

About DRC

DRC is a non-profit membership-based organization whose core work is business-to-business commercial dispute resolution for produce. DRC is a referee between parties when a purchase and sale do not go according to plan. Members adhere to a common set of trading standards and member responsibilities that promote fair and ethical trading for produce entering the North American marketplace. In Canada, membership in the DRC is a regulatory requirement to trade fresh fruits and vegetables (i.e.: buy, sell, import, export) unless excepted from the regulations. Today, DRC has members in 14 countries outside of North America, and membership continues to grow annually. Anyone exporting fresh fruits and vegetables to Canada must sell to a DRC member.

In addition to the DRC’s Operating Rules and Trading Standards, DRC offers a comprehensive, tailored suite of tools to build the knowledge and capacity of members to avoid or resolve disputes, including education, mediation and arbitration. DRC has the ability to impose sanctions and disciplinary actions towards members who do not conduct business in accordance with the terms of their membership agreement.

To date, DRC has resolved claims in excess of $83 million dollars. Although arbitration is available, 80% of these claims have been settled in an average of 26 days through our informal consultation/mediation services. Arbitration awards are court enforceable in countries that are signatories to the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards or subsequent conventions.

To learn more, reach out to our Help Desk at info@fvdrc.com or (+1) 613-234-0982 or visit us at www.fvdrc.com.

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Splitting Losses

Q. We are a wholesale receiver in Canada and recently bought a load of cucumbers originating from Mexico. We requested a CFIA inspection upon arrival as there are obvious problems in spite of good transit times and temperatures. The results of the inspection showed 25% total condition defects but no decay. We needed the product and there were no other cucumbers on the market. We shared the inspection results with the shipper who declined to make any adjustment or accept a consignment handling. While we know we could have rejected the product we elected to keep the product and claim damages so we could cover orders from as many customers as possible. After the product was sold, we provided an account of sales showing a net return of 66% of the total value of the shipper’s invoice. The shipper is not happy with the return. We would like to build a relationship with the shipper, but there is not much more we can absorb from the loss. What do you suggest we do?

A. Jaime Bustamante. First, we suggest you review your account of sales. Since you decided to keep the product and claim damages, your account of sales must show the date, amount, and price of the product sold. Your charges or expenses must be those resulting from receiving product that fails contract terms or DRC Good Arrival Guidelines. These includes freight, inspection cost, brokerage and any other direct out of pocket expense. Since the shipper offered you no help there are likely no other expenses you can claim. Without agreement you are essentially only entitled to break even. Frankly that is why most loads like this are rejected.

You have mentioned that you would like to keep working with them. There is no disagreement over the product received failing to meet DRC Good Arrival Guidelines or contract terms.   It is also true they were unwilling to discuss working the problem (which appears to be their fault) out with you.  If you are going to make a good faith offer, we highly recommend a frank discussion of how future claims will be handled .

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Membership Updates for November and December 2019

Welcome New Members

In November and December, DRC welcomed the following new members:

  • National Produce Trading Company (Pennsylvania, United States)
  • Big H Foods Inc. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Avo Azteca SA DE CA (Michoacan, Mexico)
  • Supreme Berry Farms, LLC (California, United States)
  • XFresh Produce LTD (Ontario, Canada)
  • Mucho Gusto Mexico (Ontario, Canada)
  • Ocean Harvest Seaafoods Inc. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Jear Logistics, LLC (South Carolina, United States)
  • AV Produce LTD (Alberta, Canada)
  • Daily Veggies (Ontario, Canada)
  • Mobcher Canada (Quebec, Canada)
  • Frruiticola Villamangos SPR de RL (Chiapas, Mexico)
  • Spadina Holding Group (Ontario, Canada)
  • 9407-6007 Quebec Inc. (Quebec, Canada)
  • Okanagan Speciality Fruits Inc (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Fruit Orchard Holdings, Inc (Maryland, United States)
  • Nshira Continental Supplies (Alberta, Canada)
  • Green Garden (Quebec, Canada)
  • DN Fresh (Ontario, Canada)
  • Flanagan Food Service Inc. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Intifruits Del Peru SAC (Plura, Peru)
  • Latcanam LTD. (Alberta, Canada)
  • 10621692 Canada INC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • Diamond Fruits LTD. (Ontario, Canada)
  • SJC Produce, INC. (California, United States)
  • Mexavo Produce (Quebec, Canada)
  • TWL Trading (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Anay Peruvian Fruits S.A.C. (Lima, Peru)

DRC Membership: change in status

As of December 31, the following organizations no longer hold a DRC membership:

  • Chang Sheng Supermarket LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Sam Enterprises LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Argicola La Venta (Lima, Peru)
  • Sitio De Comercio de Frutas (Permambuco, Brazil)
  • 2414692 Ontario INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Sociedad Exportadora Verfrut (Las Cabras, Chile)
  • FMK Food Limited (British Colombia, Canada)
  • Imex Andalucia INC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • La Catrina Produce Inc. (Ontario, Canada)
  • 9347-9426 Quebec IINC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • GM Impex (Quebec, Canada)
  • Sigit & Associes INC. (Quebec, Canada)
  • CSS Farms LLC (Washington, United States)
  • C & J Trading LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Orangeline Farms Sales Limited (Ontario, Canada)
  • The Fine Food Stop (Alberta, Canada)
  • Med-Alg Import & Export (Ontario, Canada)
  • Kern Ridge Growers LLC. (California, United States)
  • Angel Seafoods LTD. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Heartland Resources INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Great Giant Foods Canada INC. (British Columbia, Canada)
  • Yashica International INC. (Ontario, Canada)
  • Agroinca PPX (Arequipa, Peru)
  • 9265-7816 Quebec INC. (Quebec, Canada)

For details regarding a change in status, please contact the office.

Important note: Following membership termination, the former member remains liable for claims arising prior to their termination if the claim is submitted to DRC by way of a Notice of Dispute within nine (9) months from when the claim arose or within nine (9) months from when the claimant ought reasonably to have known of its existence.

About DRC

DRC is a non-profit membership-based organization whose core work is business-to-business commercial dispute resolution for produce. DRC is a referee between parties when a purchase and sale do not go according to plan. Members adhere to a common set of trading standards and member responsibilities that promote fair and ethical trading for produce entering the North American marketplace. In Canada, membership in the DRC is a regulatory requirement to trade fresh fruits and vegetables (i.e.: buy, sell, import, export) unless excepted from the regulations. Today, DRC has members in 14 countries outside of North America, and membership continues to grow annually. Anyone exporting fresh fruits and vegetables to Canada must sell to a DRC member.

In addition to the DRC’s Operating Rules and Trading Standards, DRC offers a comprehensive, tailored suite of tools to build the knowledge and capacity of members to avoid or resolve disputes, including education, mediation and arbitration. DRC has ability to impose sanctions and disciplinary actions towards members who do not conduct business in accordance with the terms of their membership agreement.

To date, DRC has resolved claims in excess of $83 million dollars. Although arbitration is available, 80% of these claims have been settled in an average of 26 days through our informal consultation/mediation services. Arbitration awards are court enforceable in countries that are signatories to the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards or subsequent conventions.

To learn more, reach out to our Help Desk at info@fvdrc.com or (+1) 613-234-0982 or visit us at www.fvdrc.com.

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DRC at Fruit Logistica February 5-7, 2020 Berlin, Germany

DRC will be participating in this year’s Fruit Logistica Trade Show in Berlin, Germany. On February 5-7, 2020, DRC team members will be on hand at our booth in the Canada Pavilion to meet with members and potential members. If you have a trade partner who is not currently a member, please encourage them to stop by the booth to discuss the benefits of membership.

Visit us to learn more about our full range of member benefits and services. As a private commercial dispute resolution body, DRC provides the produce trade with harmonized trading standards, education, mediation and arbitration procedures and services necessary to avoid and resolve commercial disputes in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Exporting to Canada? Canada’s Safe Food for Canadians Regulations include key trade and commerce requirement for buyers and sellers of fresh fruits and vegetables. A DRC Membership is a CFIA regulatory requirement for Canadians to buy, sell, import or export fresh fruits or vegetables, unless exempt. Make sure you are selling only to DRC members in Canada and feel free to share our information with your industry peers.

To learn about the DRC’s full suite of services and come and see us at the Canada Pavilion in Hall 23, A-15 or www.fvdrc.com